International Waters learning Exchange & Resource Network

IWC9 Detailed Agenda

20 Sep 2018

Sunday 4 November 2018

Film Festival

1830-1930, Agdal Hall

Session Coordinator: Taylor Henshaw, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization - Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission

A film festival will highlight selected GEF IW projects at IWC9. 

Submitted films must be less than 12 minutes long to be festival eligible. An independent panel will select five films from the submission pool for festival screening.

Participants will determine the winner during the festival (using the conference app). Films will be scored based on the following criteria:

Uniqueness of the topic: 

Is it an innovative approach to IW issues that could be replicated?                                                          

Good progress made: 

Does it show clear impacts of intervention and the catalytic role played by the GEF?                            

Quality of information:     

Is it educational and does it provide good promotional value to the project and/or GEF IW?                 

Production quality:

Is it visually pleasing and overall enjoyable?                                                                              

The highest and lowest judge scores will not be included in the judging totals. Project representatives are kindly asked to take audience questions following their respective film screening.

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • Participating projects share their innovative approaches and best practices to water resources management with the GEF IW Portfolio

Outputs

  • Films screened at the film festival

Desired Outcomes

  • Successful scientific and technical innovations and lessons from GEF IW project experience shared across the GEF IW Portfolio and replicated

Day One 

Portfolio Strategy and Methodology

Monday 5 November 2018

Jardins de l’Agdal Hotel

Opening, Perspectives on GEF-7, and Key Findings from the GEF IEO IW Focal Area Study

Monday 5 November 2018

0900-1030

Location: Agdal Hall

Conference Facilitator: Susanne Schmeier, IHE-Delft Institute for Water Education

Following conference welcome remarks and visionary perspectives, the GEF Secretariat will present an overview of the GEF-7 IW strategy and offer perspectives on meeting the programming directions and objectives under it.

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • Conference welcome 
  • Visionary remarks to frame the conference theme 
  • The GEF Secretariat shares their perspectives on the GEF-7 International Waters Strategy/ Programming Directions in the context of sustaining international waters cooperation and the UN Sustainable Development Goals to frame conference deliberations
  • The GEF IEO IW Focal Area Study is presented to provide an analysis of IW portfolio composition and trends

Outputs

  • Audience Survey on GEF-7

Desired Outcomes

  • Participants make use of the visionary perspectives in their discussions throughout the conference week and beyond
  • Participants are more familiar with the GEF-7 International Waters Strategy/ Programming Directions

The Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) of the GEF will present the results of the third IW Focal Area Study (2016), which comes 10 years after of the previous one. The purpose of the Study was to provide insights and lessons for the GEF-7 replenishment cycle by assessing the continuing relevance of the focal area, and its effectiveness in creating an enabling environment for transboundary cooperation and environmental stress reduction. The Study contains an analysis of the composition and trends of the entire IW portfolio (1992-2015), a synthesis of evaluative evidence from thematic and terminal evaluations and from stakeholder interviews. Its findings and final considerations may provide useful elements for countries, GEF agencies and portfolio managers.

Views from Policymakers on Sustaining International Waters Cooperation

Monday 5 November 2018

1100-1200

Location: Agdal Hall

Session Coordinators: Vladimir Mamaev, United Nations Development Programme;

Mish Hamid, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization - Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission

GEF IW projects are built upon country-driven processes and dialogues that lead to ward transboundary cooperation. Legal and institutional frameworks, but particularly national policies and regulations help drive what gets achieved in GEF IW project implementation. This session will engage high-level government representatives of the GEF IW project community on the question of how GEF IW projects can work to sustain international waters cooperation. Policymakers will be queried on what, in their experience, is relevant for projects to pursue in terms of policymaker engagement and facilitating the processes and dialogues toward cooperation, and for sustaining it.

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • Discuss and convey means on how GEF IW projects can facilitate policies and regulatory frameworks to sustain international waters cooperation  

Outputs

  • List of recommendations from the panel discussion

Desired Outcomes

  • GEF IW projects pursue strategies to sustain international waters cooperation based on the recommendations

GEF IW Project Showcase: Sustaining IW Cooperation

Monday 5 November 2018

1200-1230

Location: Agdal Hall

Session Coordinator: Taylor Henshaw, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization - Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission

GEF IW projects have a plenary opportunity to promote their innovative solutions/approaches to sustain international waters cooperation. The event will showcase solutions that best demonstrate the greatest alignment with the IWC9 theme, and specifically, with one of the conference learning tracks. The conference plenary will vote on their favorite solution, using the conference app. A prize will be awarded to the project whose portfolio solution receives the most votes.

Characteristics of a Top Portfolio Solution:

  • Feasibility and Ease of Implementation
  • Resources needed to implement the solution are readily available
  • The solution is cost-effective, or can be made so
  • The risks are identifiable, quantifiable, manageable and are minimal compared to the benefits
  • Breadth of Application
  • The conditions that need to be in place for the solution to be introduced are well defined
  • The solution is versatile and can be applied and implemented in diverse settings across multiple sectors, countries and cultures

Chosen project solutions will be presented by the respective project representatives in the Pecha Kucha 15x20 format, where the presenter shows 15 images, each for 20 seconds. Each presentation will last 5 minutes.

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • A platform for projects to present their action-inspiring solutions to transboundary waters management challenges to promote solution replication and scaling up across the IW Portfolio

Outputs

  • Solution presentations; feasibility and ease of implementation and breadth of application of each solution is captured and included in the conference report and featured on the IW:LEARN website

Desired Outcomes

  • At least one of the solutions presented utilized (directly or indirectly) by project stakeholders in their project implementation

Building Traction of the TDA-SAP Process Toward 2030 and Beyond: From Formulation Through Implementation (Kickoff)

Monday 5 November 2018

1400-1530

Location: Agdal Hall

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To share portfolio experience on ‘best practice’ and ‘lessons learned’ in the preparation, adoption and implementation of Transboundary Diagnostic Analyses (TDA) and Strategic Action Programs (SAP) in both shared marine and freshwater bodies, and discuss and compare this with country and other stakeholder views on traction and impacts within country, regional and global agendas (including the SDGs)

Outputs

  • GEF Portfolio-wide review of TDA-SAP delivery
  • Review of TDA-SAP best practice and lessons learned
  • Multi-stakeholder panel views and opinions on suite of issues regarding TDA-SAP
  • Participatory exercises to gauge IW community views on TDA-SAP
  • Two World Cafés, freshwater and marine, exploring selected TDA-SAP sub-topics

Desired Outcomes

  • Enhanced IW community knowledge and understanding of TDA-SAP and related methodology best practice; new project-to-project partnerships to share TDA-SAP and related experience; portfolio-wide improvement in the preparation, adoption and implementation of TDA-SAPs and related instruments, including mobilization of finance; enhanced awareness of TDA-SAP contribution to implementation of SDGs 6, 14, and others

Pillar Coordinators: Andrew Hudson, United Nations Development Programme; Astrid Hillers, Global Environment Facility

Building Traction of the TDA-SAP Process Toward 2030 and Beyond: From Formulation Through Implementation (Freshwater World Café)

Monday 5 November 2018

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To provide to freshwater participants an interactive platform for discussion and mutual learning on portfolio experience on ‘best practice’ and ‘lessons learned’ in the preparation, adoption and implementation of TDA-SAPs from operability, (cross-sectoral) policy coordination, public and private finance mobilization, inclusion of climate change, and relation to the SDGs point of view.
  • To discuss and compare this with country views on traction and impacts in national, regional and global agendas

Outputs

  • Better understanding of the TDA-SAP methodology and tools specific for transboundary river basins and shared aquifers;
  • Acquired knowledge on the challenges, opportunities and successful examples of TDA-SAPs implementation both at national and regional levels;
  • Linkages between national, regional and global levels (SDG 6) understood and strengthened in SAP implementation

Desired Outcomes

  • IW freshwater community’s enhanced knowledge and understanding of practical implementation of TDA-SAP approach and related methodology best practice 
  • Experience on practical aspects of the SAP implementation processes shared, including mobilization of finance, political support and policy coordination at national level
  • Climate change and resilience mainstreamed into the TDA-SAP process
  • Enhanced awareness of TDA-SAP contribution to implementation of SDGs

1600-1730

Location: Agdal Hall

Session Coordinators: Ivan Zavadsky, International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River; Aurélien Dumont, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization - International Hydrological Programme

Threats to freshwater ecosystems, stemming from urbanization and increasing food demand, further exacerbated by climate change, are increasing.  Water is fundamental to achieving most of the SDGs. Provision of water for human settlements, agriculture, energy, etc. is a risk also by water scarcity events, such as floods and droughts. Cooperation on shared freshwater systems, including groundwater is essential in most international basins to support the need for water, food, energy, and ecosystems security. The need for transboundary cooperation is an essential element for effective integrated water resources management, stipulated in SDG 6.5.

GEF IW focal area support has been for more than 25 years focused on interventions on preventative actions in transboundary basins and shared aquifers facing multiple stressors and hence potential for conflict on national and regional levels, implementing the TDA-SAP approach, allowing countries to create common interest and to invest in regional cooperation improvement of the status of transboundary water systems. The TDA-SAP process offers common, participatory fact-finding and agreement on cooperative opportunities and shared constraints and a vision for a shared future. 90 countries currently have agreed SAPs or are currently engaged in their formulation.

This session will provide to conference participants an interactive platform for discussion and mutual learning, related to participatory fact-finding and strategic planning processes in both transboundary basins and shared aquifers. They will exchange their views, experiences and national perspectives on how to make SAPs operational and how to mobilize political support and public and private finance for SAP implementation at both international and national levels. They will discuss how SAPs include climate change adaptation measures; should climate change be an integral part of the basin planning process, mainstreamed across all water users and sectors? Policies coherence and cross-sectoral co-ordination/co-operation towards implementation of SAPs; linkages between SAP targets and indicators with national reporting on progress on SDGs and delivery towards multilateral environmental agreements commitments will be explored and best practices will be shared among the session participants.

Building Traction of the TDA-SAP Process Toward 2030 and Beyond: From Formulation Through Implementation 

(Coastal Zone and Marine World Café)

Monday 5 November 2018

1600-1730

Location: Agdal Hall

Session Coordinator: Kathrin Hett, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

Intrinsically linked to prosperity and economic growth, healthy marine ecosystems have gained high-level global and national attention as critical to sustaining life on earth. In SDG 14, the international community committed to conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources.

In September 2018, the UN began its first round of inter-governmental negotiations to draft the world’s first international legally binding instrument on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity of areas beyond national jurisdiction (also known as the BBNJ Process). 

One of the main challenges for the future will be to ensure conservation and promote sustainable utilization of resources both within and beyond the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) and to ensure an effective mechanism for cooperation between inter-governmental organizations and regional arrangements in the marine space. 

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To share experiences and views with regard to the preparation, adoption and implementation of TDA and SAP and related ocean strategic planning processes in shared marine water bodies

Outputs

  • Connections between TDA-SAP processes and management organizations in the EEZ-ABNJ continuum explored
  • Issues around implementing marine spatial planning explored
  • Ways of engaging and partnering effectively with non-State actors explored

Desired Outcomes

  • Suggestions/proposals/recommendations on the different themes generated and documented

The TDA-SAP development approach for the management of Large Marine Ecosystems (LME) is consistently used to develop management strategies for LMEs. As such, it serves as an example of a mechanism to ensure cooperation to (1) identify a set of common goals and (2) ensure coordination of joint action at the regional level to achieve those goals. Under this perspective, the TDA-SAP has similarities with other mechanisms aiming at similar goals (Regional Seas Organizations, Regional Fisheries Management Organizations, future regional cooperation to be established under the BBNJ Process). Recognition of these connections opens the door to sharing experiences and lessons about effective development and implementation of regional plans.

This World Café session will look at three themes:

1. EEZ-ABNJ– Connections between TDA-SAPs, Regional Seas, RFMOs and the BBNJ Process

2. Use of marine spatial planning– coastal, and marine/ABNJ in SAPs and related ocean strategic planning processes

3. The role of non-State actors in the effective formulation and implementation of the SAP and related ocean strategic planning processes

Day Two

Partnerships and Synergies

Tuesday 6 November 2018

The Water Museum

Shark Tank

Tuesday 6 November 2018

0900-1030

Location: The Water Museum Conference Room

Session Coordinators: Session Coordinators: Christian Severin, Global Environment Facility; Keiron Brand, Aaron Vermeulen and Sarah Davidson, World Wildlife Fund for Nature; Keith Lawrence, Conservation International

“The GEF has not kept pace with the growing opportunities for partnership with the private sector. Only 43 percent of respondents to IEO’s survey agree that the GEF’s ability to engage the private sector is a comparative advantage” (GEF-7 Strategy). GEF IW Project Managers are directed to engage private sector organizations (companies, non-governmental organizations and private foundations) as a key element of their replication, sustainability and co-finance strategies. But GEF IW projects continue to face barriers to partnering with the business community, including “Most companies are unfamiliar with the GEF”; “The GEF and private sector vocabularies are different”; and “GEF activities are perceived as taking too long to satisfy private sector timeframes”. This session introduce the concept of a bankable project, and will demonstrate the “do’s and don’ts” when communicating the value proposition/business case for business community engagement in GEF IW projects.

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To build awareness of bankable projects. Introduce the concept of bankable projects and why they are key in closing the SDG financing gap
  • Gather feedback and advice on the project pitches. Teams will receive feedback on the idea and value proposition of the project from the expert panel, discuss the feasibility of the business case and the possibilities for improvement of bankability.

Outputs

  • Business community inputs on how to make a GEF IW project bankable.

Desired Outcomes

  • Inspire additional bankable projects. By demonstrating that projects can be bankable and environmentally focused the audience will be inspired to think about bankable options when reviewing environmental pressures.

In this event, experts from a range of organizations, including the business community, will review bankable project pitches from project representatives. It will be based on the popular TV show Shark Tank/Dragons’ Den, but the setting will be more constructive, and focused on progressing the projects toward funding and implementation.

Each project will provide a high-level pitch that will introduce the project to the “Sharks” (and the audience). Following each pitch there will be a short Q&A driven by the Sharks. Sharks will also provide advice to the projects and make the project representatives and audience aware of any organizations and teams that could provide support.

Partnerships to Scale Up Community-Based International Waters Management

Tuesday 6 November 2018

1100-1230

Location: The Water Museum Room 1

Session Coordinator: Sulan Chen, GEF Small Grants Programme

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To review the challenges and opportunities of translating regional frameworks or agreements into local actions
  • To consider the mechanisms or processes to incorporate local actions into regional policymaking or inter-government meetings
  • To share experiences and lessons learnt of such partnership programs

Outputs

  • Networking among participants to further ensure synergies and linkages of SGP work with full-sized projects
  • Experiences and lessons learnt are exchanged

Desired Outcomes

  • Improved understanding and knowledge regarding how to integrate local actions into regional projects
  • Improved effectiveness of the GEF IW portfolio through more collaboration between SGP and full-sized projects, and vertical integration of actions at the regional, national and local levels

The GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP) is a corporate program funded by the GEF and implemented by UNDP to support local action to address global environmental challenges. SGP provides financial and technical support to communities and civil society organizations to protect the environment while addressing poverty reduction and community empowerment. 

Local successes, if not being scaled up, have limited impacts and cannot reverse the environmental degradation trend in oceans and seas. Recognizing partnerships are essential to scaling up, SGP has worked with GEF full-sized IW projects to practice integrated ocean and coastal management through implementing regional action programs at the local level and integrating local actions to regional frameworks.

Toward a Gender Protocol for the TDA-SAP Process

Tuesday 6 November 2018

1100-1230

Location: The Water Museum Room 2

Session Coordinator: Michela Miletto, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization - World Water Assessment Programme

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • Participants provide inputs on and discuss a draft methodology for gender consideration as part of the TDA-SAP process, which eventually will guide the water projects on mainstreaming gender within the IW Portfolio

Outputs

  • The participants will gain knowledge on the importance of gender considerations in the project preparation grant (PPG) phase and in project development as part of the TDA-SAP process
  • Through the highly interactive workshop, the coordinators of the workshop will learn from the attendees - project managers and designers, organizations, relevant stakeholders – what are the elements that need to be included, better defined or eliminated in the draft methodology
  • The participants will acquire a better understanding on the relevance of science-based approaches, such the application of gender analysis, including the collection of sex-disaggregated water data, and of gender-responsive indicators in line with the SDGs (WWAP Water & Gender-Responsive Indicators, version 2018).

Desired Outcomes

  • It is expected that the workshop will represent a key contribution to the future development of a TDA-SAP Gender Protocol that will inform and guide the water projects on mainstreaming gender consideration during the development of the TDA-SAP process in IW foundational projects. 

The GEF Policy on Gender Equalitycommits all GEF projects, including IW ones, to develop a strategy and action plan on gender to guide specific actions to promote gender equality and the empowerment of women, and to monitor progress towards impacts and the broader adoption of gender sensitive policies and practices.

In 2018, the GEF launched the GEF Gender Implementation Strategy, which combines the strategy and action plan into one document to provide a comprehensive framework to support the operationalization of GEF’s new policy. In line with this, the Guidance to Advance Gender Equality, provides detail on practical steps and required actions to implement the principles and mandatory requirements specified in the Policy with a focus on gender-responsive design, implementation, and monitoring of GEF programs and projects. The Annual Monitoring Reviews show that gender mainstreamingtends to be stronger in the land degradation project portfolio (82%), followed by the biodiversity and international water portfolios (50%),and the climate change adaptation portfolio (40%). These focal areas typically involve on-the-ground activities in the local communities, where the participation of both women and men play a key role in attaining project objectives. Reviews also indicate that project proposals, as well as monitoring and evaluation reports submitted by GEF Agencies, often lack gender-specific information due in part to the absence of gender specific guideline and criteria in the GEF project templates and guidelines.

The Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis and Strategic Action Program (TDA-SAP) process recommended by GEF as the most appropriate methodology for initiating remedial actions in a transboundary waterbody, be it a Large Marine Ecosystem, a River Basin or an Aquifer System, represents the ideal framework within which to embed the analysis of gender roles in water related matters, identify gender issues of concern and inequalities (TDA), and eventually reach agreement on necessary andfeasible remedial action aimed at advancing gender equality as well as more effective water resources management (SAP). 

This workshop aims to present to GEF IW project designers, managers and beneficiary country stakeholders a draft methodology for introducing gender consideration in IW Foundational Projects. The different roles played by women and men in water supply, stewardship and management at the different levels, from the household to the governments and to transboundary water management bodies, should in fact be unraveled as part of the definition of the baseline of every foundational IW projects: a baseline upon which the project will strive to bring about measurable improvements in terms of transboundary cooperation and water security. The promotion of gender equality and women empowerment must be part of this effort toward overall water security and resources sustainability.  

The workshop will propose for discussion with the participants a “draft working protocol” for introducing gender consideration into the TDA-SAP process in order to further tailor it to specific GEF project needs. It is expected that this dialogue with IW project stakeholders will provide crucial elements for the definition of the methodology, while at the same time expanding the participants knowledge on the available tools for a science-based approach to gender analysis.

Using Planning Tools to Support the TDA-SAP Development and Updates

Tuesday 6 November 2018

1100-1230

Location: The Water Museum Room 3

Session Coordinator: Katharine Cross, International Waters Association; Oluf Jessen, DHI

Extreme climate events are a reoccurring theme of many transboundary diagnostic analyses (TDA) and strategic action programmes (SAP).  The IW focal area of the GEF identified the increased frequency and unpredictability of floods and droughts as a priority concern in transboundary contexts, along with the other multiple drivers that cause depletion and degradation of shared water resources.

Responding to these needs, GEF IW has produced on online Flood and Drought portal (http://www.flooddroughtmonitor.com/home), which can support transboundary basins in their planning processes, including developing and updating their TDA and SAP.  The portal provides planning support to combine, consider and address multiple priority stresses for individual water bodies with a view to optimizing water resources management. 

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To promote learning and knowledge exchange with GEF IW projects on using advanced information exchange (e.g. using the Flood and Drought portal) in developing and updating TDAs and SAPs. 

Outputs

  • Participants gain exposure and experience in the use of data tool solutions for planning and water management, specifically for the TDA-SAP process.   
  • Participants acquire skills in navigating the applications available which can support their TDA-SAP development and updating 

Desired Outcomes

  • Strategic recommendations for the GEF IW Portfolio around the integration of Flood and Drought Portal into the TDA-SAP processes

The portal has a number of technical applicationsto assistland, water and urban area managers operating in transboundary river basins to recognize and address flood and drought impacts including their increasing magnitude, variability and unpredictability. The applications can be applied individually or together to incorporate information on floods, droughts and future scenarios into existing planning processes across scales. 

The development and use of this portal also responds to the GEF-7 Strategy, especially under strategic action 3.1, which focus on “Advanc[ing] information exchange and early warning. This includes use of ‘Flood and drought early warning systems and disaster risk management plans”, as well as “Enhanced capacity to gather, distil and process data sources into policy relevant analysis”. 

The workshop will provide in-depth knowledge on how such methodology and tools focusing on planning with climate change can specifically support the TDA-SAP process. The session will be an opportunity to explore pathways for applying the tools in the Flood and Drought Portal across the GEF IW freshwater portfolio to improve planning and management of water resources in the context of climate variability and change.

The applications are designed to be used across more than 220 transboundary basins worldwide. The workshop will also include insights from some of the testing basins (Volta, Lake Victoria and Chao Phraya Basins) on their experiences with the package of tools, and how they have been or are being integrated into their planning processes. 

From Environmental Pressures to Investment Solutions Using the TDA-SAP and GEF Programmatic Approaches

Tuesday 6 November 2018

1100-1230

Location: The Water Museum Conference Room

Session Coordinator: Lorenzo Galbiati, UN Environment Mediterranean Action Plan

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To demonstrate successful examples of how the TDA-SAP and GEF Programmatic Approaches have fostered investment solutions, through a dialogue bringing together representatives of the Mediterranean and Caribbean LMEs, the Governments of Morocco and Lebanon and the European Investment Bank (EIB).

Outputs

  • Participants with better understanding of similar TDA-SAP processes happening in two different LMEs.
  • Participants acquire information on the challenges, best practices and lesson learned in translating the TDA-SAP approach into practices at national level.
  • GEF IW Stakeholders gain insight on the perspectives of International Financial Institutions such as EIB in identifying and bring to maturity bankable investments projects in LMEs.

Desired Outcomes

  • Strategic increased uptake of the GEF Programmatic Approach across the IW Portfolio, integrating the TDA-SAP Approach as well as external financing institutions to scale up interventions in agreed upon hotspots in LMEs.

The Transboundary Diagnostic Analysis/Strategic Action Programme (TDA-SAP) Approach is a highly collaborative process that has proven to be a major strategic planning tool for GEF International Waters Projects over the last 16 years. The TDA provides the factual basis for the formulation of the SAP. The TDA is a facilitative process of engagement and consultation with all the key stakeholders from the initial steps of the TDA to the subsequent development of alternative solutions during the formulation of the SAP. The TDA is a mechanism to help the participating countries to 'agree on the facts'.

The SAP is a negotiated policy document, and once endorsed by the government of the countries, it establishes clear priorities for action (for example, policy, legal, institutional reforms, or investments) to resolve the priority transboundary problems identified in the TDA though interventions which take place at the national level. As an additional step, when the TDA and SAP are agreed upon, the countries define and approve National Action Plans (NAPs), which identify hotspots of intervention at the national level.

During this session, the Mediterranean and Caribbean LMEs will discuss their experiences in implementing the TDA-SAP Approach. This exchange will be enriched by the experience of two Mediterranean Countries (Lebanon and Morocco), which will share best practices and lesson learned in the execution of the SAP and NAPs, and by the contributions of the European Investment Bank, which is supporting the investment component of the GEF Multifocal Areas Programmatic Approach: the Mediterranean Sea Programme (MedProgramme): Enhancing Environmental Security.

Technical Site Visits

Tuesday 6 November 2018

1330-1800

Location: Various

Technical site visits, “Past, Present and Future of Water Management in Morocco,” will highlight a range of water management challenges faced by the country, and traditional and new approaches to combat these challenges. Site itineraries will be made available closer to the conference, and may include visits to the Marrakesh Palm Grove, khetteras and seguias in the city vicinity, the Marrakesh Medina, city gardens, private sector facilities and GEF Agency projects.

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To showcase/observe local examples of good practices in water resources management

Outputs

  • Participants visit local sites to learn about a range of water management challenges faced by the country, and traditional and new approaches to combat these challenges

Desired Outcomes

  • Local innovative approaches and best practices to water management are absorbed by GEF projects and utilized in project implementation

Day Three

Tools and Practices for IW Practitioners

Wednesday 7 November 2018

Jardins de l’Agdal Hotel

New Practices and Tools for More Informed Decisions and Better Management of Systems (Kickoff)

Wednesday 7 November 2018

0900-1030

Location: Agdal Hall

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To enhance the application of existing IW tools and practices and to expose the IW community to new and rapidly evolving disruptive technologies, business models and policies, with potential to advance transformation at scale

Outputs

  • Forty percent of IW stakeholders report back that they have enhanced their knowledge and understanding of evolving technologies and that they are positive toward exploring disruptive technology application in future projects/pilots

Desired Outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge and understanding of evolving technologies that have the potential to “disrupt” traditional development paradigms and rethink how countries plan and manage water and other national resources, including in a transboundary setting   

Pillar Coordinators: Steffen Hansen, Global Environment Facility; Dimitris Faloutsos, Global Water Partnership-Mediterranean; Yumiko Yasuda, Global Water Partnership

There are a number of evolving technologies that have the potential to “disrupt” traditional development paradigms. Many of these innovations can help us rethink how countries plan and manage water and other natural resources, including in a transboundary setting. 

These “disruptive technologies” can be grouped in many different ways. This session will focus on three such groupings: helping us rethink decisions; helping us rethink decisions; and helping us rethink interaction. The real power of disruption comes in the way these technologies are combined and deployed to solve development challenges. They have tremendous potential in changing the way development happens around the world and also bring in concerns that need to be effectively managed.

This plenary session will also kickoff the subsequent clinic carousel, with experts (“doctors”) providing a 1-minute “teaser” advertisement on their clinic topic.

New Practices and Tools for More Informed Decisions and Better Management of Systems (Clinic Carousel)

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To 

Outputs

  • 40 percent of IW stakeholders report back that the clinic sessions have increased their understanding of the pre-identified challenges and their subsequent capacity to implement appropriate tools and solutions.   

Desired Outcomes

  • Enhanced knowledge and understanding of new and existing Tools and Practices to help increase the impact and sustainability of IW investments.

Wednesday 7 November 2018

1100-1230

1400-1530

Location: Agdal Hall

In the Clinic Carousel, "doctors" will lead "patient-focused" sessions on their topic of expertise, in a campfire-style format (group huddle). The individual clinic topics and “how to” questions have been framed as part of a demand driven approach across the IW portfolio and constitutes a chance for practitioners/countries (“patients”) to connect with the doctors and identify tools and solutions capable of solving very real challenges on the ground and across the IW portfolio. While many of the clinics topics and tools are not new per se, they continuously undergo refinement and often have yet to be mainstreamed across the IW portfolio.

Participants officially have the option to attend two of the eight clinics offered in each 90-minute block. After 40 minutes, a horn will sound, signalling the end of the clinic. Ten minutes is allocated for participants to move to another clinic and doctors to reboot. 

CLINIC ROUND 1

(1) How can we use economic valuation to bridge the science to policy gap? 

Christian Susan, UNIDO

To set the ground for the participatory session the clinic will shortly elaborate on the concept of values, on the total economic value of ecosystem services and the underlying principles for the determination of the total economic value. Particular attention will be given to the importance of externalities and the difference between private and public costs/benefits. A short outlook will be given to the tiered tools that have been developed under the GEF IW:LEARN 4 project for the actual implementation and use of the economic valuation of “wet ecosystem services”. The doctor/moderator will then solicit experiences from the GEF portfolio on how the economic valuation tool has been already been used to inform decision making processes and the allocation of resources. This will set the ground the participatory process/ discussion how the participants consider that the economic valuation tool can be used to bridge the science to policy gap.  With a short wrap-up of the key messages the clinic will close its doors.

(2) How will the updated TDA-SAP guidance assist my project?

Peter Whalley, GEF IW:LEARN

GEF IW:LEARN has been updating the 2013 TDA-SAP guidance manual by including experiences and practices from recent selected GEF global projects that have generated documents on specific topics that can assist projects in the TDA-SAP process. The GEF has delivered more than 30 TDA-SAPs over the last 20 years and this is the third update of the GEF guidance on developing TDAs and SAPs. The update includes guidance and links to manuals on Economic Valuation of Ecosystems, LME:LEARN, Floods and Droughts Management Tools, Transboundary Waters Assessment Programme (TWAP), Gender Mainstreaming and Groundwater Governance developed by GEF projects. The clinic will present an overview of the updates to the TDA-SAP methodology and how this can be utilized by GEF IW projects. Patients will be welcome to seek advice from all at the clinic in finding the best approaches to undertake TDA-SAP activities to avoid common pitfalls. All welcome to present their TDA-SAP related ailments!

(3) How do I mainstream gender into my IW project in light of the new GEF policy on gender equality?

Michela Miletto, UNESCO-WWAP; Sarah Davidson, WWF

This clinic will begin with a brief summary of the new GEF Policy on Gender Equality to put the discussion in context. The “doctors” will then work to diagnose and respond to some of the most frequent questions coming from IW project “patients”, with concrete tips and tools on how to implement the new GEF Policy on Gender Equality in relation to IW projects.  Participants are encouraged to bring their own urgent gender mainstreaming questions!

(4) How can my fisheries project help deliver more fish in the ocean, more food on the plate, and more prosperity for coastal communities?

Tim Fitzgerald and Alexis Rife, Environmental Defense Fund

This clinic will focus on collaborative, science-based approaches for developing successful fisheries outcomes. We will begin with a brief overview of EDF’s new Sustainable Fisheries Toolkit. Then, based on the project backgrounds of attendees, the group will choose its own adventure and dive into an interactive exploration of one of the following topics: designing fisheries management systems that meet the goals and needs of fishing communities; making science-based decisions in data-limited situations; determining biological, social, and economic performance indicators for your fishery; or linking fisheries management with marine reserves.

(5) How to make visible the invisible? Tools to raise the profile of groundwater from local to global

Aurélien Dumont and Alice Aureli, UNESCO-IHP

A general review of the specificities of groundwater resources and aquifers in terms of assessment, incentives for use, benefits, and governance will serve as the starting point of this clinic. Tools covering the same areas will be proposed to the patients, depending on their needs, as a basis for discussion, so that they are better capacitated to make groundwater visible in decision-making and transboundary cooperation initiatives.

(6) How to measure and understand ecosystem health: practical tools for inland and coastal waters

Derek Vollmer, Conservation International

Most people recognize that healthy ecosystems are an important component of successful GEF-IW projects. But making these connections explicit is often easier said than done. This clinic will discuss two user-friendly resources for measuring, understanding, and managing ecosystem health from multiple perspectives—the Freshwater Health Index and the Ocean Health Index. These science-based tools assess the status and trends of the benefits that people receive from freshwater and marine ecosystems, such as clean water, fisheries, and recreational uses - as well as the overall condition of these ecosystems, and governance factors that impact ecosystem health. Data-rich interfaces and practical guidance documents provide a range of stakeholders —managers, planners, communities, businesses, civil society organizations and policymakers — with the information they need to incorporate ecosystem health into decision-making processes. Participants will hear about experiences from coastal and inland applications from around the world and learn how they could start using the tools in their own projects.

(7) How do I promote the effective management of marine areas beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) through the TDA-SAP process? 

Miriam Balgos, Global Ocean Forum

This clinic will begin with a brief overview of ABNJ and its management and the ABNJ programs and projects conducted within the framework of the GEF IW focal area. The "doctor" will then respond to questions coming from IW project "patients" regarding addressing ABNJ issues through the TDA-SAP process within the context of the GEF-7 objective on ABNJ, existing management frameworks for ABNJ and LMEs, and the ongoing process of establishing an international legally-binding instrument on ABNJ under UNCLOS.

(8) How to achieve a good nutrient balance in our environment – the key to a healthy planet, healthy living!

Chris Cox, GNC; Wilfried Winiwarter, IIASA; Sara Walker, WRI

This clinic will explore best practices and strategies to address harmful nutrient impacts from field to watershed scale. Participants will learn about the nutrient challenge and tools to assess environmental health impacts. The clinic aims to discover opportunities for replication and to attract investment through your project to your community.

CLINIC ROUND 2

(9) How do I capture the value of coral reef and related ecosystem services? 

Liz Izquierdo, CCRES

This clinic will begin with a summary of how the tools developed by CCRES assist people, governments and NGOs improve coastal resources management and develop sustainable livelihoods. Then, using real-life examples from their practice with the tools in the East Asian Seas, the “doctors” will diagnose questions from participants and prescribe solutions for sustaining and capturing the benefits of coastal ecosystems.

(10) How do I build a project website and visualize my spatial data? And how can access data to support critical transboundary decision making?

Nagaraja Rao Harshadeep, World Bank; 

Miles Macmillan-Lawler, GRID-Arendal

The clinic will introduce you to the IW:LEARN web toolkit (https://iwlearn.net/learning/toolkits), a custom toolkit for building project websites that adhere to the IW:LEARN website guidelines. The clinic will demonstrate how to request a new web toolkit site, give an overview of the features of the web toolkit, and highlight the resources available to help you build your site using the web toolkit.The clinic will also introduce the IW:LEARN visualisation toolkit (https://iwlearn.net/learning/toolkits/geonode) – a powerful toolkit for storing, finding and visualising spatial data. The clinic will give an overview of how to use this toolkit to store your project spatial data, combine it with other data layers and create interactive visualization for inclusion in websites and other project communications.The final element of the clinic will demonstrate how we can benefit from free global data and analytical services (from increasingly powerful earth observation and in-situ data curation) and how countries can promote more open “analysis-ready” data formats to allow users to access, visualize, and interact with data and analytical services.  It will also introduce concepts of data service catalogs, making customized “interactive dashboards” to support decisions drawing on these data, analytical, and visualization services in the form of interactive portals, apps, or e-books.

(11) How do I diagnose and treat weak governance?  An exercise regime

Lauren Wenzel, NOAA; Wojciech Wawrzynski, ICES

This clinic will begin with an brief overview of the GEF LME:LEARN Governance Toolkit and the challenges of ocean governance.  We will then use a checklist to diagnose common ocean governance challenges, weaknesses and ways to address them with clinic participants.  Participants will share their questions and knowledge with each other to spark new or different approaches to address governance issues that are essential for successful IW projects. 

(12) How do I convince politicians, industries and the public to not waste "waste"water? 

Christopher Corbin, CReW

This clinic will begin by providing an overview of the importance of wastewater management with examples from the Wider Caribbean Region and the implementation of the GEF funded Caribbean Regional Fund for Wastewater Management (CReW) Project.  The “doctor” will identify ongoing challenges, opportunities and approaches for improving the management of wastewater including a circular economy approach. Innovative financial and technological solutions as well as approaches for changing behaviours and perception about wastewater reuse will be highlighted. The clinic will conclude with how lessons learned from CReW are being used to inform the design of a follow up CReW+ Project Proposal.

(13) How can I better plan for floods and droughts?

Katharine Cross, IWA; Oluf Jessen, DHI

Flooding, drought and other climate extremes are not new to us. However, we are prone to the impacts and need to deal with the increasing frequency, unpredictability and severity of these natural occurrences. In this clinic, our “doctors” will put forward a smart water management tool enabling water resources managers to prepare and plan for flooding and drought events. The “patients” will not only be able to plan and manage water resources but also make decisions on impactful investment across their basins which in turn contributes to the Sustainable Development Goals.

(14) How can we develop indicators that are contextually relevant and are responsive to the TDA process?

Sarah Davidson, WWF; Heath Kelsey, UMCES; Chris Cox, GNC; Maija Bertule, DHI

The TDA-SAP development process has similarities and overlap with the River Basin Health Report Cards process created by WWF and UMCES, and used by UNEP in a GEF project context. We suggest an adaptation of the report card process that results in co-development of the TDA with stakeholders. This process will result in indicators that are contextually relevant and will provide added value to the TDA process through fostering shared visioning, fostering new collaborations as leverage points for future action, establishing baselines, and prioritization of transboundary problems. We will highlight the overlap between the two processes, introduce to practical indicator tools that can support the process, and will demonstrate the value of stakeholder engagement in indicator selection through an interactive role playing exercise designed to integrate multiple knowledge streams in value setting, indicator selection, and conceptualization.

(15) How to address climate change in transboundary basins, including tools, approaches and good practices

Sonja Koeppel and Hanna Plotnykova, UNECE

Climate Change is significantly impacting water resources in transboundary basins (e.g. water quality and quantity, ecosystem degradation and biodiversity loss). Adapting to climate change involves developing vulnerability assessments, adaptation strategies and action plans, but also incorporating climate change adaptation into strategic documents focused on river basin management as well as sectoral strategies and plans. In particular, within the GEF projects climate change adaptation can be integrated into TDA, SAP, implementation of practical measures and demonstration projects. Therefore, this session will show how to mainstream climate change adaptation into national strategies and plans, how to integrate it into the GEF projects, how to prioritize adaptation measures and find funds for their implementation.

(16) How to apply Source-to-Sea management in practice

Dimitris Faloutsos, GWP-Med; Louise Whiting, FAO

This clinic will begin with the doctor indicating the practical challenges in terms of implementing the S2S approach (being a management integration tool). The “patients” will build around these, putting their experience forward in terms of challenges. The doctor will then propose “therapies” and facilitate discussion on how and to what extent these therapies work in the field. The discussion will revolve around the following questions: What are the components of a source-to-sea system? How to determine the boundaries of the source-to-sea system/reference area? How to define and analyze the components of the anthropogenic and natural environment within a source-to-sea system /reference area as well as how to define and analyze the interactions among these components? Which stakeholders to involve, when and how? and how to design and monitor intervention strategies.

Getting the News Out: Communicating Your Project Results

Wednesday 7 November 2018

1600-1730

Location: Bahia

Session Coordinator: Tiina Kurvits, GRID-Arendal

Information is not enough. If it were, we wouldn’t be facing a global climate, extinction and pollution crisis. There would be no need for the GEF because these problems would have been solved. And there would be no need for IW:LEARN because the work it undertakes would not be necessary.

But human beings do not make decisions solely based on information. Creating “new knowledge” is not much use if your audience does not connect in some way. And connection is not just an intellectual response, it is emotional. Connection leads to action.

One of the best ways to connect is through storytelling. Telling stories is part of what makes us human. But it requires a clear focus and clear language. Translating scientific concepts into a format that is easy to understand takes practice. IW:LEARN is a good platform for communicating a wide variety of topics to multiple audiences. This session will offer tips on how to write a story and how to promote it using social media.

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To learn how to write a compelling and interesting story that will hold a reader’s attention. To use stories as a means of promoting the IW:LEARN portfolio

Outputs

  • A presentation on how to structure an on-line storyA presentation on how to use social media to promote your story

Desired Outcomes

  • Participants have a better understanding of how to write and promote an interesting story using social media. They have learned the importance of the “inverted pyramid” style to organize information in their stories

Managing International Waters Projects

Wednesday 7 November 2018

1600-1730

Location: Menara

Session Coordinator: Mary Matthews, United Nations Development Programme

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • The objective of the workshop is for participants (CTAs, Project Coordinators, and Project Managers) to learn how to address the hands on practical challenges of managing an international waters project, from the foundational TDA-SAP phase, through SAP implementation and beyond, with an emphasis on transboundary challenges. This session will address, planning, logistics, team leadership and management, stakeholder engagement, managing Steering Committees, focal points, and national teams, with strong communication for enhanced team building and a better working experience for everyone

Outputs

  • Participants with a better sense of their own strengths as managers, and the common challenges, and solutions of managing a GEF IW Project
  • Participants will learn through best practices how address areas where projects often have trouble, how to identify and avoid these areas
  • Participants will be able to return to their home offices with a stronger network of fellow managers, a community of practitioners, and some clarity on how things are supposed to work (and how they actually do work too)

Desired Outcomes

  • Increased Project Management confidence for improved project implementation in the GEF IW Portfolio, and stronger IW teams for future generations

Managing a GEF International Waters project is an exciting endeavor and requires a wide range of technical and administrative skills. Most GEF IW Projects have different implementing and executing agencies and at least two countries for the project manager to juggle. Additionally, budgets are always tight, currency values change, plans seem vague, and the ebb and flow of the national and regional institutions can create significant drag. Add to these challenges the responsibility for supervising international and multidisciplinary teams, hiring and directing hordes of consultants, and keeping your steering committee in the loop. It is no wonder that the GEF IW Project Managers are some of the most adaptive and resilient in the world. The project manager has to be very careful in addressing technical issues that may lead to political problems between the countries. She must review all the project outputs to ensure of that.

Yet implementing and executing agencies, steering committees, national counterpoints and other partners are all aware that there are traits that make for great project managers. Many Chief Technical Advisors do not have a strong high-level management background, and many who may have strong managerial experience do not possess the technical finesse necessary to captain a project through the international waters. There is a unique challenge in fostering national level project ownership while dancing to balance respect for national cultures and maintaining neutrality. A key benefit of working in the GEF IW Community is the immense opportunity to learn from others in your similar positions, to rely on adaptive management, creative problem solving, trialing innovative approaches all while building the emergent national capacities in your region. 

This session will discuss—through the exchange of good practices, lessons learned, and question and answers with project managers—how to overcome the hurdles that can frustrate project leadership, and how to turn seeming insurmountable difficulties into opportunities for project growth and development. Topics to be covered will be: planning, team management, capacity building, leadership and delegation, communicating with stakeholders and using design thinking to foster innovation that will benefit the greater GEF IW Portfolio. 

Enhancing Access and Dissemination of Knowledge to Improve Scientific Cooperation 

Wednesday 7 November 2018

1600-1730

Location: Agdal Hall

Session Coordinator: Youssef Filali-Meknassi, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization - International Hydrological Programme

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • For participants to discuss—through the exchange of good practices and lessons learned—how tools for better access and dissemination of knowledge help decision-makers manage water resources more efficiently

Outputs

  • Participants have a better understanding of the current and future knowledge-access landscape and opportunities within it
  • Participants have an improved knowledge and better understanding of good practices and lessons learned on information-driven decision-making, including beyond GEF IW
  • GEF IW project stakeholders are better equipped to understand what actions can be taken in order to promote and give visibility to the results and achievements of their projects

Desired Outcomes

  • Integration of strategies to ensure and promote access to information and dissemination of knowledge from the planning phase of project
  • Increased knowledge-sharing derived from the GEF IW project portfolio

Governments across the globe face pressure to improve how they allocate and spend resources, and deliver public goods and services. In this regard, data, information and knowledge are critical for understanding how to share and use limited resources to respond to the needs of people, the economy and the environment. This forms the basis of science-informed decision-making process, and ensures a sound management and governance of water resources. 

Knowledge derives from contextualized information, which itself consists of data (i.e. raw facts) that has been processed, organized and structured data to make it meaningful and usable. Despite the increasing gathering and availability of data in many parts of the world, the use of information to inform policies for improving the management of fresh and marine water resources remains limited. Reasons include a shortage of financial and human resources, a lack of commitment and investment from political leadership, gaps in technical skills, and an absence of clearly defined strategies and mechanisms to support the sharing and use of data and information. Those elements represent major development and management challenges for countries and GEF project managers. 

In order to guarantee the efficiency of projects implemented, as well as their sustainability—i.e. the capacity of countries to seize and implement sound management of water resources – it is essential to develop tools to foster the access to and use of information and knowledge by decision-makers and water-stakeholders at large. Strategies in this sense include the implementation of visualization tools, the use of open-access, the creation of communities of practice, etc. 

This session will discuss— through the exchange of good practices and lessons learned—how such tools can be effectively implemented and used to favor sound, science-based decision-making, harnessing the results of GEF IW projects and fostering the sustainable management of water resources. 

MSPglobal - Supporting Internationally Accepted Marine Spatial Planning 

Wednesday 7 November 2018

1600-1730

Location: Koutoubia

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • Support International marine/maritime spatial planning (MSP) by enhancing cross-border and transboundary cooperation where it already exists as well as through the promotion of MSP processes in areas where it is yet to be put in place. 
  • Build collective capacities to respond to emerging ocean issues through ecosystem and area-based management tools such as integrated coastal area management, marine spatial planning and sustainable blue economy initiatives, including transboundary and large-marine ecosystem approaches for the sustainable use of marine resources and with a view to achieve a healthy and a productive ocean.
  • Increase collective knowledge and information products supporting management actions on the status and change of coastal and marine ecosystems and sustained services through use and dissemination of data, information and decision support tools.  

Outputs

  • Participants with better knowledge on how national and regional efforts in the context of large marine ecosystems may be directly framed within long-term strategies towards the development for integrated coastal management and marine spatial planning programs in support of a sustainable blue economy.
  • Participants to acquire knowledge on emerging ocean issues through ecosystem and area-based management tools and sustainable blue economy initiatives, including transboundary and large-marine ecosystem approaches for the sustainable use of marine resources with a view to achieve a healthy and a productive ocean.

Desired Outcomes

  • Improving planning of sustainable economic activities at sea by promoting the establishment of MSP plans and by creating an environment conducive to transnational cooperation through the development of international guidance for cross-border and transboundary MSP.

Session Coordinator: Alejandro Iglesias Campos, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization - Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission

With the support of the Government offices of Sweden and the European Commission

Intensified activities in coastal and marine waters require integrated planning and decision-making and enhanced efforts, including transboundary coordination, to achieve sustainability and improved management. Traditional inshore activities such as local fishing and tourism are increasingly in conflict with new activities such as mariculture, renewable marine energies, scientific research, military activities, among others, while in offshore waters new developments pose potential challenges in the management of ocean space to avoid spatial conflicts between shipping, foreign fisheries, mineral development, bioprospecting and energy development, among others.

MSP is viewed as a public analysis and allocation process for the spatial and temporal distribution of human activities in marine areas to achieve ecological, economic and social objectives that have usually been specified through a political process bringing together the different users of the ocean in order to address multiple objectives and make coordinated decisions. 

Therefore, MSP is an important means to achieve global ocean governance goals and Agenda 2030 by fostering integrated management practices to protect and restore marine and coastal ecosystems, avoid significant adverse impacts, strengthen resilience, and promoting healthy and productive oceans. 

The session will provide the context for active and effective participation of policymakers, stakeholders, scientists and citizens to discuss on how to improve governance at multiple levels, including cross-border and transboundary planning in large marine ecosystems as the recipe to achieve an ecosystem-based approach to supporting the ocean economy.

Day Four

Tools and Practices for IW Practitioners

Thursday 8 November 2018

Jardins de l’Agdal Hotel

Transformational Solutions for Long-Term Sustainability of Ongoing and New Interventions (Kickoff)

Thursday 8 November 2018

0900-1030

Location: Agdal Hall

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • The Plenary will attract all IWC9 participants and therefore aims to set the overall scene and entice participants to the three simultaneous follow on breakout sessions. 

Outputs

  • Shared understanding on the big ideas for each of the three themes to break the degradation cycle including through rewarding sustainable investment
  • Shared understanding on the role that the GEF Partnership can play in supporting the transformation agenda 

Desired Outcomes

  • Recognition that business as usual is not an option 
  • Identification of some of the big ideas which we need to consider in the three themes
  • Recognition that greater focus on switching investment patterns is key 
  • Better understanding on how the TDA-SAP and blue economy space complement each other 
  • How to better draw on the formidable array of technical and financing capabilities in the GEF Partnership to strengthen this agenda 

Pillar Coordinators: Leah Karrer, Global Environment Facility; Christopher Warner, World Bank

This session will talk to the future by briefly highlighting the big ideas for achieving breakthroughs in the IW space in three critical areas: (1) blue economy; (2) nature-based solutions; and (3) circular economy.  The discussion will include: Outlining the big ideas/ building blocks for transformation in each theme; How to switch and reward investment in sustainability to break the cycle of degradation; Strengthening governance and enabling conditions; Rethinking/aligning the TDA-SAP with blue economy; and the role of the GEF Partnership in the above.

The three lead experts from the three breakout sessions to follow (nature-based solutions; circular economy; blue economy) will each provide an inspirational overview of their topic, laying out the key issues, the status of action globally and the required building blocks for achieving the required change in trajectory/ transformation. 

This will be supported by a discussion on the financial aspects of the three themes. The speakers will then participate in a moderated audience facing discussion with emphasis on implications for IW projects, including the TDA-SAP process. This will be followed by Q & A between the panelists and from the floor. 

Transformational Solutions: Nature-Based Solutions (Breakout)

Thursday 8 November 2018

1100-1230

Location: Menara

Session Coordinator: Derek Vollmer, Conservation International; Colin Apse, The Nature Conservancy

Becoming Boring: How can Nature Based Solutions be accepted as mainstream solutions to freshwater, climate and economic development challenges?

This session will highlight the important role that natural ecosystems, and ecosystem-based management, can and must play in meeting goals for water security, climate resilience, and economic development in both inland and coastal environments.

Protecting upland forests, constructing treatment wetlands, restoring coastal mangroves, and “green infrastructure” interventions more generally can make major contributions to these goals, but have typically been underinvested in historically. Nature-based solutions (NBS) have made major technical progress and are more feasible than ever. Technical challenges do remain, but NBS upscaling is also hindered by policy environments and financing mechanisms that favor more conventional gray infrastructure.

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To share experiences and lessons in how to design, implement, finance and scale NBS to problems, including water security, climate resilience and economic development

Outputs

  • Discussion of the challenges and barriers that must be overcome as we seek to ‘make nature-based solutions boring’—to make them accepted and implemented as mainstream solutions.

Desired Outcomes

  • Connections brokered between practitioners working on similar issues.

Following a brief overview presentation on the state of NBS and their role in the green/blue economy, participants will debate and discuss topics such as:

  • How to combine green and gray infrastructure solutions
  • Tools and approaches for incorporating NBS into spatial plans
  • Accounting methods that reflect that full value of NBS to regional economies
  • How can NBS be financed? Are NBS ‘bankable’?

The session will be informal, interactive and open for inputs from all. Participants will include project managers of NBS projects, technical leads, and others interested in these solutions.

The discussion will address the main challenges and barriers that must be overcome to make NBS accepted and implemented as mainstream solutions; participants will share their experiences of applying NBS; and the group will identify a broad portfolio of existing and planned NBS initiatives.

Transformational Solutions: Circular Economy (Breakout)

Thursday 8 November 2018

1100-1230

Location: Koutoubia

Session Coordinators: Nilguen Tas, United Nations Industrial Development Organization; Isabelle Vanderbeck and Jill Raval, United Nations Environment; Liz Izquierdo, Capturing Coral Reef and Related Ecosystem Services Project

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To introduce session participants to circular economy principles and practices

Outputs

  • Participants awareness and understanding of circular economy principles and practices is enhanced
  • Participants exchange on and identify circular economy solutions with links to the international waters and other agendas

Desired Outcomes

  • Systemic and transformational solutions offered by circular economy approaches are disseminated to wider stakeholder groups of the GEF IW focal area by participants
  • Integrated programming between GEF IW and other focal areas increasingly deploy transformational solutions offered by circular economy approaches

Circular economy is an industrial economy that is restorative by intention, aims to rely on renewable energy sources, and systemic innovation is at its core. It is a new way of creating value, through extending product lifetime and relocating waste from the end of the supply chain to the beginning - in effect, using resources more efficiently by using them more than once. For instance, plastics are versatile materials that have many uses in construction, irrigation, food, clothing, footwear, furniture, automotive, among other sectors. 

Extending lifetime of plastic products by repairs, reuse, sharing, and recycling or upcycling does not only conserve embedded energy and labor in such products with positive impacts on emissions, but is also the most effective strategy to reduce land-based sources of pollution of our freshwater, coastal and marine ecosystems. Employing designs that ease their disassembly, sorting and recycling; process innovations that replace toxic inputs with alternatives, reduce water and energy use in production, recycle wastewater for reuse; new business models that replace ownership with access so that consumer uses the product as a service are some of the new practices that circular economy approaches offer.

Whether a product is made from biological materials of agriculture, fishery and forestry origins or technical materials extracted by mining; such as minerals, petroleum, and chemicals and other synthetic materials not based on biological nutrients, closing the loops in production and use with circular economy practices returns nutrients back to nature and are transformational solutions towards sustaining health of our ecosystems.

Transformational Solutions: Blue Economy (Breakout)

Thursday 8 November 2018

 1100-1230

Location: Agdal Hall

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To share country and institutional frameworks for blue economy development
  • Based on those frameworks, share project-level successes and challenges across blue economy sectors, including fisheries and aquaculture, transport, energy, tourism, and more.  
  • Discuss linkages and value-adding to TDA-SAP process with respect to blue economy interventions and transitions

Outputs

  • Participants acquire a better understanding on the importance that sustainable and integrated blue economy requires greater knowledge of the coast and the ocean, thus improving access to information and public participation.
  • Identification of national and regional efforts in the context of large marine ecosystems framed within long-term strategies towards the development for integrated coastal management and marine spatial planning programs in support of a sustainable blue economy.

Desired Outcomes

  • Provide responses to emerging ocean issues through ecosystem and area-based management tools and sustainable blue economy initiatives, including transboundary and large-marine ecosystem approaches for the sustainable use of marine resources with a view to achieve a healthy and a productive ocean.

Session Coordinators: Henry DeBey, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; Julian Barbiere and Alejandro Iglesias Campos, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization- Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission

Coastal areas, the ocean and their resources represent strategic assets in which the majority, if not all, of the countries are increasingly investing, in sectors such as coastal tourism, aquaculture, energy production and maritime transport. National authorities view these ocean activities as promising opportunities for the diversification and integration of their economies.

A closer analysis of the extent of issues covered in SAPs and NAPs and the number of NAPs formulated from SAPs revealed that some of the LMEs GEF has invested in have NAPs formulated. In some cases, the NAPs are indeed national plans that cover a spectrum of issues but more often they are limited to recommendations for investments as seen in the GCLME and the ASLME. In another LME, the NAPs were based on themes or issues such as mangroves and seagrasses. One common feature among the few NAPs formulated and implemented is weak national ownership and investment in the SAP and NAPs, and therefore reliance on subsequent GEF funding to undertake the needed actions.

The GEF’s inclusion of the Blue Economy in its 7th Programme is an opportunity to strengthen the relevance of SAPs and NAPs to national governments and the private sector and to increase their investment in managing the resources of their EEZs so that can break their dependence on GEF funding.

The key question is how do we take advantage of these opportunities especially given our experience of working with financial institutions on Blue Economy, working on strategies at country and regional levels, and implementing Blue Growth interventions at national and local scales? 

The session will discuss how the blue economy contributes to the blue growth of the countries by providing basic socio-economic benefits in terms of food security, safety and job creation.

Adopting the Water Funds Model for Sustainably Financed Source Water Protection of GEF IW Project Basins

Thursday 8 November 2018

1400-1530

Location: Menara

Session Coordinators: Colin Apse, The Nature Conservancy

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • To provide a rapid Water Funds orientation and training that will allow GEF IW projects and partners understand what a Water Fund is and how elements of the scientific, public-private governance, implementation, and sustainable finance model could be adapted to meet their source water protection and restoration needs.

Outputs

  • Participants will have a working knowledge of the fundamental concepts of Governance, Science, Finance, and Implementation with regards to Water Fund development.
  • Participants will learn about applied examples of Water Fund successes and challenges. 
  • Participants engage in applied learning by sharing their experiences and expertise.
  • Participants have the opportunity to follow up, if the model is promising to them, with online training and mentorship to further explore using this source water protection approach.

Desired Outcomes

  • Participants understand how the Water Funds Project Cycle can be used to address source water protection and restoration challenges.

The session is a targeted session to support GEF IW stakeholders in exploring whether the Water Fundmodel is an appropriate fit for their source water protection and restoration ambitions. Guided by trainers in a peer-learning environment, the session participants will examine the Water Fund Project Cycle and begin to apply the feasibility steps required to begin a Water Fund development process.  The session will explore application and adaption of the Water Fund model in transnational basins, such the Cubango-Okavango Basin, as well as smaller urban source water basins, like the Upper Tana in Kenya.

Whether the participants’ goal is to protect water sources from an identified threat such as sedimentation, improve water yield, or scale up catchment restoration activities, a Water Fund can be a useful tool to address many different social and conservation needs. This participant-led workshop is being organized by The Nature Conservancy’s Africa Water Funds team, in collaboration with WWF North Africa and FEMSA Foundation. 

Participants will also be provided with the opportunity to learn about a new capacity building program for protecting water at its source. This will include the demonstration of new tools—a state-of-the-art Toolbox, Training, and Network—built around the globally-relevant, consensus-based best practices approach for developing Water Funds. 

Learn more at: how a water fund worksWater Funds Field GuideSub-Sharan Africa’s Urban Water BlueprintBeyond the Source: the environmental, economic and community benefits of source water protectionNairobi WF Business Case

See case-studies atNairobi WF, KenyaCauca Valley, ColombiaNew Mexico, USARio de Janeiro, BrazilWF Training

Analysis of Transboundary Water Ecosystems and Green/Blue Infrastructure: A Bottom-Up Approach

Thursday 8 November 2018

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • Ensure stakeholder engagement, knowledge exchange and social learning across aquatic ecosystems to achieve practical policy solutions and to co-create concepts and develop products, share experiences with implementing policies and respective management approaches, as well as provide critical feedback on project outputs as a contribution to the general discussion within the context of the GEF-7

Outputs

  • Participants able to understand how to identify and assess drivers and pressures of aquatic ecosystems, understand causalities between biodiversity, ecosystem functions and services
  • Participants acquire knowledge on the exchange of data, information and research results through an information platform and forecast biodiversity and ecosystem service provision
  • All project stakeholders understand how to support the achievement of international biodiversity targets by delivering a consolidated and coherent outlook for aquatic ecosystems; increasing knowledge on biodiversity and drivers of aquatic ecosystem change; supporting the management of natural protected sites and invasive alien species; and testing business models for the provision of ecosystem services that will contribute to ecosystem protection.

Desired Outcomes

  • Advance science and knowledge by contributing to the integration of biodiversity, freshwater, coastal and marine knowledge, concepts, information, methods, and tools across multiple research fields. 
  • Connect policy, businesses and society by improving EBM, thus resulting in broader constituencies for conservation and expanded possibilities to guide decision-making, as well as opportunities to add or create new value to protected areas and manage aquatic ecosystems sustainably outside of these areas

1400-1530

Location: Agdal Hall

Session Coordinator: Alejandro Iglesias Campos, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization- Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission

With the support of the AQUACROSS Project financed by Horizon 2020 of the European Commission.

The aim of this session is to understand the social and ecological system of transboundary regions to design a multifunctional Green and Blue Infrastructure network—with conservation, exploitation and restoration objectives—and implement Ecosystem-Based Management (EBM) measures with a comprehensive focus on freshwater, coastal and marine realms.

Economic activities such as the agriculture, livestock, fisheries and tourism are highly dependent on terrestrial and aquatic resources. The aquatic ecosystems provide a vital range of provisioning goods, and cultural, regulation and maintenance services for sustaining human well-being. 

Green and Blue Infrastructure combines in one single solution an EBM outcome that balances conservation, restoration and exploitation objectives. The Green and Blue Infrastructure multi-zoning approach offers co-benefits in terms of ecosystem and biodiversity conservation as well as human well-being, while minimizing the potential conflicts between conservation and exploitation goals.

The local and regional experiences observed through the exchange of good practices and lessons learnt at the Intercontinental Biosphere Reserve of the Mediterranean: Andalusia (Spain) – Morocco (IBRM) served to identify key areas that allow conserving biodiversity, maintaining ecosystem services capacity, and restoring degraded ecosystems, while minimizing costs. The results suggest that implementing EBM restoration measures when designing Green and Blue Infrastructure may result in greater coverage, while improving connectivity across its core and conservation zones.

The session will discuss on the potential measures to improve EBM for transboundary water ecosystems as an example for projects to be developed within the framework of GEF-7 and the context of IW. 

Learning from the Past for Next Generation Source-to-Sea in Asia and Beyond

  Session Goals

Objectives

  • The aim of the session is for participants to engage with S2S proponents and practitioners working with the GEF in Asia (and beyond) to learn about the challenges and opportunities associated with taking a S2S approach to river basin management. Participants will be given the additional opportunity to question S2S project proponents; and investors to gather information on the shape and design of next generation S2S programming. 
  • GEF-IW stakeholders will acquire a better understanding of how to design projects utilizing a S2S approach that have long-term sustainability ‘built in’ from the outset. 

Outputs

  • Practitioners, decision-makers, investors and project designers from Asia and other regions have an improved and evidence-based understanding of what works and what does not in terms of designing and implementing S2S projects.
  • Participants better understand some common country demands/needs and are able to modify and adapt the evolving S2S approach to meet these needs in a way that is inclusive, effective and sustainable.  
  • S2S stakeholders are more aware of the current barriers and challenges to effective S2S governance and management, and are familiar with a menu of new tools and solutions that can be used to help overcome common barriers. 

Desired Outcomes

  • The diverse range of S2S projects (existing and new) and their associated partners across Asia are moving toward a more collaborative approach to S2S governance and management that is informed by best practices and underpinned by cutting edge tools and techniques that support integrated and sustainable S2S approaches.  
  • GEF-IW receives a range of high-impact S2S proposals for the GEF 7th replenishment cycle that are technically sound, utilize the latest tools and technologies, and strongly align with national policy objectives, stakeholder needs and the GEBs.

Thursday 8 November 2018

1400-1530

Location: Koutoubia

Session Coordinator: Louise Whiting, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; Donneth Walton, Asian Development Bank

Ecosystems along a continuum from source-to-sea are being degraded as an unintended consequence of economic activities that might happen far upstream or downstream in the source-to-sea system (Granit. J. et al, 2017). This is happening primarily for two reasons: first, a lack of awareness and understanding of the land-to-sea ecosystem linkages and flows of water, sediment, pollutants, biota and ecosystem services. Second, a lack of capacity and know-how to avoid or mitigate the interconnected threats and negative impacts coming from multiple sectors and multiple resource users. 

The S2S approach aims to address these barriers and achieve the sustainable development of national or shared river basins from the source to the discharge into coastal areas by highlighting the dynamic connections between terrestrial and marine environments and raising awareness among stakeholders of how one group’s resource use affects other users and vice versa. 

Agriculture in the broadest sense (crops, livestock, aquaculture and fisheries) is frequently the biggest user of water along a S2S continuum in Asia, particularly the large-scale irrigation schemes that dominate Asia. Agriculture has a significant (and often worsening) impact on freshwater ecosystems in terms of water quality, quantity, timing of river flows and connectivity as well as the supply to domestic and other users. The FAO approach to S2S, therefore, is prioritising concrete investments that focus on a small number of priority flows stemming from the agricultural sub-sectors. The approach seeks to enhance positive flows(clean water, biota, biodiversity) and reduce negative flows(agro-pollutants, sediments, etc.). Activities can include watershed rehabilitation, improved irrigation and on-farm water management, farmer field schools to change/reduce agro-pollutants, ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management, green infrastructure including mangrove restoration, natural capital accounting and market-based instruments to support sustainable production. 

The S2S in Asia session is designed to facilitate an in-depth exchange between practitioners that are already implementing projects, proponents that are designing future projects and investors that are financing S2S projects across Asia. This exchange should help to underpin a new and improved generation of S2S projects both in Asia and beyond. 

Integrated Ridge-to-Reef Approaches in Pacific SIDS: Perspectives and Experiences

Thursday 8 November 2018

1400-1530

Location: Bahia

Session Coordinator: Jose Padilla, United Nations Environment Programme

The GEF has been supporting programs and projects that implement integrated approaches to address environmental issues in SIDS around the world. Within the limited geographic confines of small islands, integrated ridge-to-reef approaches are appropriate to tackle biodiversity loss in terrestrial and marine ecosystems, degradation and loss of habitats, pollution of the groundwater, land degradation, carbon sequestration, among others. This session will bring together project proponents from the Pacific to share experiences and lessons learned. It is expected that these will serve as guideposts in designing and implementing R2R projects in SIDS in the Pacific and elsewhere.

In the Pacific during the GEF 5 replenishment period, a programmatic approach entitled “R2R- Pacific Islands Ridge-to-Reef National Priorities – Integrated Water, Land, Forest and Coastal Management to Preserve Biodiversity, Ecosystem Services, Store Carbon, Improve Climate Resilience and Sustain Livelihoods” is currently being implemented. The program consists of 15 child projects – 14 national R2R projects and a regional program support project. All the 14 Pacific SIDS that are beneficiaries of the GEF are implementing on-the-ground integrated approaches at either the catchment level and/or in small islands or atolls. These national child projects are supported programmatically and technically by the program support project, which on its own has demonstration activities in each of the SIDS. The R2R program is a showcase for a multi-focal, multi-trust fund and multi-agency regional program.   

  Session Goals

Objectives

Outputs

Desired Outcomes

The Way Forward: Sustaining IW Cooperation

Thursday 8 November 2018

1600-1700

Location: Agdal Hall

Session Coordinator: Christian Severin, Global Environment Facility

The closing plenary will feature reflections on the IWC9 and the take-home messages from each of the conference’s principal sessions. The implications of these messages in the context of future implementation of GEF IW projects and sustaining international waters cooperation will be discussed. 

A ceremonial transfer of the Conference Cup to the next host region will conclude the conference.